Student Newsletter for April, 2019

Summer and Graduate Access to Westlaw, Lexis Advance, and Bloomberg Law

Apr 16, 2019

Summer Access for Continuing Students

Bloomberg Law and Lexis Advance each offer continued summer access to students for both academic and work purposes. 

You will also have summer access to Westlaw and Practical Law (which you can access through Westlaw), but you cannot use your academic password in situations where you are billing a client. Examples of permissible uses for your academic password include the following:

  • Summer coursework
  • Research assistant assignments
  • Law Review or Journal research
  • Moot Court research
  • Non-Profit work
  • Clinical work
  • Externship sponsored by the school

If you have any questions regarding summer Westlaw access, please contact Annemarie Milton at annemarie.milton@tr.com.

Graduate Access

Bloomberg Law

Spring 2019 graduates may continue to use their Bloomberg Law IDs for six month following graduation. Graduates do not need to register for this access.

Lexis

Lexis Advance

Spring 2019 graduates will have access to Lexis Advance through December 31, 2019. Graduates do not need to register for this access.

ASPIRE for Non-Profit Work

Spring graduates engaged in verifiable 501(c)(3) public interest work may apply for a LexisNexis ASPIRE ID, which provides 12 months of access. Spring grads can go to lexisnexis.com/grad-access for more information on how to apply.

Westlaw

Graduating students can use a variety of Thomson Reuters products, including Westlaw, Practical Law, Drafting Assistant Essential, and the Doc & Form Builder, for 18 months after graduation. Your “Grad Elite” access gives you 60 hours of usage per month, with no restrictions against using the products for professional purposes. For more information, please visit: https://lawschool.westlaw.com/Marketing/Display/PR/2.

Students need to sign up for this access, and may do so here: https://lawschool.westlaw.com/authentication/gradelite

Law Library Study Aids and Past Exams

Apr 16, 2019

The Law Library has a number of study aids available to help students prepare for exams. West Academic Study Aids online includes outlines, summaries, hornbooks, Legalines, and ExamPro preparation materials. The LexisNexis Digital Library of Online Study Aids includes the Mastering series, Questions & Answers series, and the Understanding series. Each platform allows access via multiple devices, and provides sophisticated tools for taking notes and testing your knowledge of the subject. Some of the same materials in print format are available on Reserve in the Law Library. For additional information on study aids, see: https://libguides.law.uiowa.edu/studyaids.

In addition, the Law Library has a selection of Iowa Law past exams, primarily via ICON, with a few select exams available in print on Reserve. On ICON, select “Ongoing Courses” and then “College of Law Academic Resources.” To view a list of past exams available on Reserve, please visit the Circulation Desk in the Law Library.

Law Library Carrel Renewal for 2019-2020 Academic Year

Apr 16, 2019

Current 1Ls and 2Ls

If you are a current first year or second year law student and would like to renew or change your Law Library carrel assignment for the next academic year (2019-20) please complete the online survey at https://uiowa.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_a3s8MBWqZBWAuJ7 by Friday, April 26 at 5 pm.

If you do not complete this form by Friday, April 26at 5 pm, you will not have an assigned carrel next academic year. If you later decide that you would like an assigned carrel, you will need to apply along with the incoming 1Ls.

If you will have a carrel or desk space elsewhere in BLB (for example, as an editor on Law Review, TLCP, JCL, or JGRJ) for one or both semesters next academic year, you will not qualify for a Law Library carrel that semester or academic year while you have alternative space (https://library.law.uiowa.edu/student-services).

Current 3Ls

If you are a third year law student graduating this May, you may use your assigned carrel for bar study. Please remove any items in the carrel by August 1, 2019.

If you have any questions, please contact Dawn Banovitz at dawn-banovitz@uiowa.edu or Kevin Burford at kevin-burford@uiowa.edu.

Advanced Legal Research Courses for 2019-2020

Apr 16, 2019

To help you become efficient and effective researchers, and to help you meet your experiential credit requirements, there are several Advanced Legal Research courses being taught by librarians during the 2019-20 academic year:

 Fall Semester

  • Semester-long: Advanced Legal Research, a two-credit survey course taught by Ms. Ellen Jones
  • Semester-long: Foreign, Comparative, and International Law Advanced Legal Research, a two-credit survey course taught by Mr. Don Ford
  • First eight weeks: Advanced Legal Research Methods in Specialized Subjects: Tax, a one-credit topical course taught by Ms. Kathy Hall

Winter Intersession

  • One week: Advanced Legal Research Methods in Specialized Subjects: Corporate/Business, a one-credit topical course taught by Mr. Don Ford
  • One week: State Legal Research: Iowa, a one-credit topical course taught by Ms. Ellen Jones

 Spring Semester

  • Semester-long: Advanced Legal Research, a two-credit survey course taught by Ms. Kathy Hall and Mr. Don Ford
  • Semester-long: Advanced Legal Research Methods in Specialized Subjects: Family & Elder Law, a one-credit topical course taught by Mr. Ted Potter
  • First eight weeks: Advanced Legal Research Methods in Specialized Subjects: Litigation & ADR, a one-credit topical course taught by Ms. Amy Koopmann
  • First eight weeks: Advanced Legal Research Methods in Specialized Subjects: Legal History, a one-credit topical course taught by Ms. Noëlle Sinclair

ALR courses are restricted to upper level law students. If you have questions about these courses, please contact the instructor.

Recent Biographies of Supreme Court Justices

Apr 16, 2019

No shortage exists of books about the United States Supreme Court and its justices. While many books focus on past cases, the Court’s decision-making process, or inside secrets of the Court, one subset of books focusing on the Supreme Court are biographies of the justices.

Several new biographies of Supreme Court justices have been released over the last year, specifically biographies of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, retired Justice Sandra Day O’Connor, and Chief Justice John Roberts.

Justice Ginsburg—Ruth Bader Ginsburg: A Life by Jane Sherron De Hart

Past books have focused on various aspects of Justice Ginsburg’s life, so readers may be surprised that Ruth Bader Ginsburg: A Life is the first full-length biography of the justice.

The author of Ruth Bader Ginsburg: A Life, Jane Sherron De Hart, originally began this project with plans to focus on Justice Ginsburg’s time as a civil rights lawyer, with the justice providing the author access to her litigation archives, as well as providing multiple interviews to the author between 2000 and 2005. Over time, though, De Hart transformed the book into a full-length biography. While Justice Ginsburg’s official biographers are still at work on their biography, so the justice limited what she shared with Hart, “De Hart has written an excellent biography based on archives and interview with colleagues and friends.”

Jeffrey Rosen, A Notorious Advocate for Gender Equality, Wash. Post (Nov. 8, 2018), https://www.washingtonpost.com/outlook/a-notorious-advocate-for-gender-equality/2018/11/08/4c97594e-dea6-11e8-b732-3c72cbf131f2_story.html?utm_term=.41c57834b64e [https://perma.cc/ND9J-6PXX]   

InfoHawk+ Record

Justice O’Connor—First: Sandra Day O’Connor by Evan Thomas

In First: Sandra Day O’Connor, author Evan Thomas explores the woman who came before Justice Ginsburg on the Supreme Court: Justice Sandra Day O’Connor. In writing the book, the O’Connor family provided Thomas with access to Justice O’Connor’s papers and encouraged law clerks and colleagues to speak with Thomas. The resulting book encompasses Justice O’Connor’s personal and professional life, from growing up on a ranch on the Arizona-New Mexico border to her days on the Supreme Court. While at the Supreme Court, Justice O’Connor served as an important swing vote on a number of issues. Fortunately for the reader, “Thomas avoids the case-by-case death march that is the plague of judicial biographies, and by focusing on a handful of decisions he gives a clear sense of how she understood her role.”  

Jeffrey Toobin, An Intimate Portrait of Sandra Day O’Connor, First Woman on the Supreme Court, N.Y. Times (Mar. 18, 2019), https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/18/books/review/evan-thomas-first-sandra-day-oconnor.html [https://perma.cc/AQ6Q-W5AK]

InfoHawk+ Record

Justice Roberts—The Chief: The Life and Turbulent Times of Chief Justice John Roberts by Joan Biskupic

Rounding out the list of recent Supreme Court justice biographies is Joan Biskupic’s book The Chief: The Life and Turbulent Times of Chief Justice John Roberts. Biskupic is not new to the Supreme Court justice biography scene—the CNN legal analyst has written biographies of Justices O’Connor, Scalia, and Sotomayor. In preparing this book, she spoke with Justice Roberts for over 20 hours, spread across seven interviews.

Justice Roberts has been criticized by both the left and the right—by the left for his decision in Citizens United, among many others, and by the right for upholding the Affordable Care Act in 2012. In tracing his upbringing, education, and career, Biskupic finds Justice Roberts pulled between two desires: one to move the Court right on a number of issues, and one to preserve respect for the Court as a nonpolitical institution. The biography is “assiduously reported and briskly written” and “offers new behind-the-scene details.”

Adam Cohen, The “Enigma” Who Is the Chief Justice of the United States, N.Y. Times (Mar. 18, 2019), https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/18/books/review/joan-biskupic-chief-life-turbulent-times-chief-justice-john-roberts.html [https://perma.cc/N3DY-3DY5]

David M. Shribman, John Roberts: The Focus Is on the Man in the Middle, Boston Globe (Mar. 22, 2019), https://www.bostonglobe.com/arts/books/2019/03/21/john-roberts-focus-man-middle/QGR73o3DCVOIb8Txr0FatL/story.html [https://perma.cc/2ZEH-Z3GM]

Using the Law Library During Finals

Apr 16, 2019

As finals approach for the College of Law and the rest of the university, the Law Library may be busier than usual. If other students are talking loudly or otherwise disturbing you, please report the issue to the Circulation Desk. In turn, please be considerate of those around you.

Law Library Material Due Date

Apr 16, 2019

Most Law Library materials are due back May 1. You may renew materials in person at the Circulation Desk or online by signing in with your HawkID and password and visiting your library account. Please visit the Circulation Desk with any questions.

Summer Research Questions

Apr 16, 2019

As you begin your summer positions, remember that the Law Library is here to help. If you have research questions this summer, please feel free to call the Law Library’s reference line at (319) 335-9005.  While the reference librarians cannot do your research for you, they can discuss strategies and recommend resources to use in your research.

Law Library Exam and Summer Hours

Apr 16, 2019

Law Library Exam and Summer Hours

Exam Hours

The Law Library will have extended exam hours from April 26 through May 9.

Day

Time

Friday, April 26

7:00 am – 12:00 am

Saturday, April 27

9:00 am – 12:00 am

Sunday, April 28 (regular hours)

10:00 am – 12:00 am

Monday, April 29 – Friday, May 3

7:00 am – 12:00 am

Saturday, May 4

9:00 am – 12:00 am

Sunday, May 5 (regular hours)

10:00 am – 12:00 am

Monday, May 6 – Thursday, May 9

7:00 am – 12:00 am

 

Summer Hours

Summer hours begin Friday, May 10.

Day

Time

Sunday

10:00 am – 10:00 pm

Monday – Thursday

7:30 am – 10:00 pm

Friday

7:30 am – 6:00 pm

Saturday

9:00 am – 6:00 pm

Memorial Day (May 27)

CLOSED

Independence Day (July 4)

CLOSED

 

New Electronic Resources

Apr 16, 2019

PLI Plus

The Law Library now subscribes to PLI Plus, the Practising Law Institute’s research database. This database covers 25 practice areas and provides access to over 100,000 documents, including several practice-focused treatises; materials from PLI continuing legal education courses, including course handbooks, transcripts, and forms; the Answer Book series, which presents information in a question and answer format and includes practice pointers and checklists; and articles written by practitioners.

New HeinOnline Database: GAO Reports and Comptroller General Decisions

HeinOnline’s GAO Reports and Comptroller General Decisions database contains reports on audits, surveys, investigations, and evaluations of federal programs conducted by the United States Government Accountability Office (GAO), as well as decisions and opinions issued by the Comptroller General. Other than restricted or classified documents, all published reports, testimonies, correspondence, and special publications are available in this database. While these documents are also available on the GAO website, HeinOnline provides enhanced metadata for an improved search experience.